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Photos of Flowers Being Shocked With 80,000 Volts

Published 3 years ago

California-based photographer Robert Bulteman doesn’t need a camera, lens or computer. Using Kirlian photography techniques, he is able to take these photos by shocking the plants with thousands of electric volts and then capturing the plant’s coronal discharge.

According to Wired, “Buelteman begins by painstakingly whittling down flowers, leaves, sprigs, and twigs with a scalpel until they’re translucent. He then lays each specimen on color transparency film and, for a more detailed effect, covers it with a diffusion screen. This assemblage is placed on his “easel”—a piece of sheet metal sandwiched between Plexiglas, floating in liquid silicone. Buelteman hits everything with an electric pulse and the electrons do a dance as they leap from the sheet metal, through the silicone and the plant (and hopefully not through him), while heading back out the jumper cables. In that moment, the gas surrounding the subject is ionized, leaving behind ethereal coronas. He then hand-paints the result with white light shining through an optical fiber the width of a human hair, a process so tricky each image can take up to 150 attempts.”

Website: | via: Wired, Laughing Squid

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electrography, flowers, Kirlian photography, plants, Robert Bulteman
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