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30 Interesting Snippets Of Information That Might Make You Say “Today I Learned” Something New (New Facts)

Published 8 months ago

In this age of information and knowledge, we learn something new every day. And most people will agree that learning has become easier in the past few years, thanks to the internet! Isn’t it fun to find out some random interesting snippets of information while scrolling on your social media feed?

If you are a regular reader of DeMilked, then you might be aware of the “Today I Learned” online community. This subreddit is dedicated to sharing “interesting and specific facts about something that you just found out.” We have gathered some new facts from this community, scroll below to read them. And check out more such facts in our previous posts here, here, and here.

More info: Reddit

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#1

Image source: LiuKang69

TIL that two buttons in WWII RAF uniform can be put together to make a mini compass which indicates towards north.

#2

Image source: AquamarineCheetah

TIL in the Red Sea, giant moray eels have been observed hunting cooperatively with coral groupers. The grouper approaches an eel’s hiding place and shakes its head rapidly to indicate that it wants to hunt. The eel recognizes the signal and accompanies it on the hunt where they work in tandem.

#3

Image source: FntasticJellyBabies

TIL the wolves/dogs used to film The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (2005) had to have CGI butts/tails because they were too happy to appear menacing.

#4

Image source: RedditPrat

TIL that figure skater Mabel Fairbanks, who was was banned from rinks as a child due to her African American and Native American ancestry, went on to coach skating greats like Scott Hamilton, Kristi Yamaguchi, and Debi Thomas, and was the first African American in the US Figure Skating Hall of Fame.

#5

Image source: HootOill

TIL about Operation Meetinghouse – the single deadliest bombing raid in human history, even more destructive than the atomic bombing of Hiroshima or Nagasaki. On 10 March 1945 United States bombers dropped incendiaries on Tokyo. It killed more than 100,000 people and destroyed 267,171 buildings.

#6

Image source: Status-Victory

TIL in 2015 an Australian woman put a bet on a horse at 100-1 and won $825, she then took a selfie with the winning bet slip, posted it to Facebook, somebody saw it and put the barcode into an automated betting machine and stole her winnings.

#7

Image source: BringsHomeBones

TIL that In 2015, that a three-story tall lamp post became so corroded by urine that it snapped and fell over, crushing a nearby car.

#8

Image source: Hilla007

TIL that some urban birds like finches and sparrows use cigarette butts as a form of pest control for their nests. The nicotine in the cigarettes helps keep parasites away.

#9

Image source: Severe-Draw-5979

TIL that by 400 BC, Persians had developed Yakhchal, Ancient Refrigerators capable of storing solid ice in the summer in the desert.

#10

Image source: Shark-Farts

TIL the mother of the last Comanche chief was a white woman who was kidnapped at age 9 & assimilated into the tribe. She later married a chieftain & bore him 3 children before she was found at age 33 & returned to her bio-family. She never accepted white society & committed suicide by starvation.

#11

Image source: FuriouSherman

TIL that during his time as the narrator for the US version of the first four seasons of the children’s TV show Thomas the Tank Engine, George Carlin spoke his lines to a teddy bear in the booth because he was nervous about performing without an audience.

#12

Image source: PikesPique

TIL that Michigan police once rounded up a group of local drug dealers by inviting them to the fake wedding of two of the dealers’ regular customers, who were really undercover police officers. The arrests got underway after the band (also undercover police officers) played “I Fought the Law”.

#13

Image source: dilettantedebrah

TIL the crawfish farming industry in Louisiana grew after rice farmers began breeding them in their rice fields. They realized that they could farm crawfish throughout the year without it affecting their rice. It also served as an extra source of income for them.

#14

Image source: Yurekuu

TIL that, on average, half of all service dogs fail their training. Due to this poor rate, South Korea experimented with cloning service dogs that had already passed their training. The resulting clones passed at rates much higher than average.

#15

Image source: Str33twise84

TIL Miranda Gibson lived on a small platform 60 metres above the ground in a 400-year-old Eucalyptus tree to protect the surrounding forest. A bush fire forced her to evacuate after 449 days but Tasmania’s Wilderness World Heritage Area was officially extended by 170,000 hectares a few months later.

#16

Image source: olagon

TIL 45 years ago, ahi (tuna) were caught for fun and ground into pet food. In Japan, tuna was called neko-matagi, meaning “fish that even a cat would disdain”.

#17

Image source: the_freshest_scone

TIL that the Animal Planet reality series ‘River Monsters’ ended because star Jeremy Wade was able to catch essentially every exceptionally large freshwater fish species on earth, leaving no remaining content for the show.

#18

Image source: zahrul3

TIL that Iceland was once covered in trees until the Vikings came and cut them down to make room for sheep.

#19

Image source:  ecstaticadventure

TIL Freshwater snails are one of the world’s most deadly animals because they transmit the organism that causes schistosomiasis (aka bilharzia), which is, in and of itself, one of the most deadly parasites on the planet! Nearly 230m people were infected in 2014 and there are~200,000 deaths annually.

#20

Image source: danuser8

TIL Women have been legally allowed to go topless in public in New York City since 1992.

#21

Image source: PBGr12

TIL that smokers whose insula got damaged after a stroke were able to quit smoking easily one day after the stroke, with no relapse and urges, suggesting that this brain region might play a role in nicotine addiction.

#22

Image source: SilasMarner77

TIL that during a murder trial in 1994 an English jury got drunk and consulted an Ouija board to determine the killer. This led to a retrial.

#23

Image source: SomeGuy671

TIL that a proposed 1896 Pennsylvania law required motorists who encountered livestock to: stop their vehicle, disassemble it, and conceal the parts until the livestock were sufficiently pacified.

#24

Image source: nunped

TIL that in 1429, King Charles VII of France exempted the town of Domrémy from paying taxes “forever”, after a promise to Joan of Arc. Taxes were imposed again during the French Revolution.

#25

Image source: wauwy

TIL Eurypterids, an order of arthropods completely wiped out by the world’s biggest mass extinction, were scorpion-like giants that could reach almost ten feet in length.

#26

Image source: nathanthrax

TIL Oreo has to call the white center “creme” instead of “cream” because the FDA does not allow manufacturers to use the word “cream” to describe a food that contains no cream at all.

#27

Image source: PikesPique

TIL about Frieda Caplan, a pioneer in the world of produce who built a successful business in the 1960s by promoting items that, at the time, were relatively unheard of in the U.S. such as mangoes, shallots, and a New Zealand fruit originally called “Chinese gooseberry,” which she dubbed the kiwi.

#28

Image source: Cogz45

TIL Rio de Janeiro was once the capital of Portugal. Following the conquest of Portugal by Napoleon, the Portuguese royal family fled to Brazil (1808-1821). They then established the capital of Portugal in Rio de Janeiro.

#29

Image source: thisCantBeBad

TIL that during a college football game in US, many people gathered upon the roof of a glass blowing factory to watch for free. The roof collapsed, spilling fans onto a furnace. Twenty-three people were killed but the game continued. The event is known as The Thanksgiving Day Disaster.

#30

Image source: BainVoyonsDonc

TIL that dingoes were brought to Australia by humans around 4,000 years ago, and are actually an ancient breed of domestic dog.

Saumya Ratan

Saumya loves to explore beautiful, crazy, and wholesome stuff on the internet. She seeks to find something interesting in everything and strives to share her inspirations and explorations with people all over the world.

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amazing facts, awesome facts, interesting facts, interesting trivia, TIL, Today I Learned, trivia
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