Ukrainian Artist Julia Pilipchatina’s Beetle Art Brings A Centuries Old Art Form To The Table

Published 9 months ago

Porcelain painting is a time-honored artistic tradition that originated in China and later found its way to Europe. It gained widespread recognition and was embraced by prominent porcelain factories. This art form has endured through the ages and continues to thrive in the present era.

For Ukrainian artist Julia Pilipchatina, the art of hand-embellishing plates is not just a creative pursuit but a profound connection to her heritage and personal history. With an innovative spirit, she breathes new life into the centuries-old practice of porcelain painting.

In an exclusive interview with DeMilked, In an exclusive interview with us, the artist shared her unique insights and experiences. When asked about her artistic journey and inspiration, Julia passionately expressed, “Porcelain painting is an activity that combines my love for tableware and illustrations. I focused on this form of art after moving to Belgium due to the start of the war in Ukraine. I am fascinated by the durability and functionality of painted tableware. It exists at the intersection of art and utility, challenging individuals to accept themselves as the highest form of art and freely engage with these objects, using them daily to set the table.”

Check out some of her wonderful works in the gallery below.

More info: Instagram | Behance | Etsy 

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Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Discussing the importance of family history and the preservation of memory, Julia reflected, “Most of the time, we don’t have any material objects left by our ancestors, and our family stories are erased. However, porcelain is often passed down through generations within families. That’s why I create these items with the thought that humanity will reach a point where we can live in our homes for many generations and preserve the memory of our families in fragile objects. I create memory, history, and hope.”

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Delving into the rich history of porcelain painting, the artist shared, “Porcelain painting is an ancient art that originated in China and spread to Europe. It was then adopted by all leading porcelain factories, which were typically supported by royal houses and still exist to this day. Today, it is a rather rare craft due to its complexity. Overglaze painting requires great attention and patience. Each layer of paint must be fixed by firing it in a special kiln at a temperature of 800 degrees Celsius. Some porcelain factories continue to produce hand-painted items, but these are usually very limited editions.”

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Speaking about her love for the process and the challenges it entails, Julia remarked, “I love this process. It demands inner balance and patience because firing the tableware always carries risks. If a piece in the kiln cracks or the color turns out unexpectedly (which happens sometimes), I calmly take it and redo the item.”

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

As our interview with Julia Pilipchatina came to a close, it was clear that her passion for porcelain painting runs deep. Through her artistic endeavors, she bridges the gap between the past and the present, preserving history, and infusing everyday objects with artistic beauty. Her dedication to the craft and her unwavering belief in the power of porcelain painting to evoke emotions and preserve memory continue to inspire and captivate audiences worldwide.

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Image source: Julia Pilipchatina

Saumya Ratan

Saumya is an explorer of all things beautiful, quirky, and heartwarming. With her knack for art, design, photography, fun trivia, and internet humor, she takes you on a journey through the lighter side of pop culture.

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art, artist, interview, Julia Pilipchatina, painting, porceain painting, Ukrainian artist
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