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20 Things That Are Casual In Europe But Not In America, As Pointed Out In This Online Thread

Published 3 months ago

Americans usually visit Europe for holiday trips as they enjoy the beauty and culture of the amazing place. People who visit Europe for the first time usually find a number of surprising things that almost give them a culture shock. Some U.S. citizens even grew so fond of the European lifestyle that they decided to move permanently.

There are a few Reddit threads like “what surprises Americans most about Europe“, “the biggest differences Americans who move to Europe have observed“, and “normal in Europe but strange in America” in which many Americans have pointed out the differences between America and Europe. Scroll below to read some of those answers.

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#1

Image source: Socialist-heathen, pexels

“Not me, but my sister. She may say something else if she were asked, but this had always stuck out to me.

She moved to Sweden about 4 years ago. A year prior to the move, she noticed a large lump on her neck, kind of just under her ear area. Concerned, we went to instacare to check it out. Tumor. Benign, so not dangerous yet but we still wondered how much it would cost to remove.

I think the number was around $17,000. After insurance.

So she waited, got surgery after being in Sweden for awhile. The entire thing cost her $30”

#2

Image source: 2abyssinians, unsplash

“Still trying to get used to my five weeks of vacation. The three weeks this summer with my family was incredible. Still having two weeks to spend with them at Christmas, is beyond belief. All vacation is paid vacation. And it is standard everywhere. Oh and the two hour lunch, and 32 hour work week. I think this is is literally going to add up to years more with my family. Since I think time with my family is the most important thing, this just makes the quality of life here so much higher. I don’t know if I will ever get used to it. But I love it!”

#3

Image source: seawest_lowlife, unsplash

“I’m Canadian, but I had a pretty profound moment when I realized the bench I was sitting on was older than my country.”

#4

Image source: yunith, unsplash

“How everyone uses normal speaking voices, and how loud I am as an American.”

#5

Image source: [deleted] , pexels

“How awesomely rural a lot of England is. I stayed in Cambridge and was impressed by how well preserved the green space was.

Also, when you buy produce, how it’s usually labeled with the farm it came from. Awesome.”

#6

Image source: [deleted] , unsplash

“When I was sixteen I went to Poland (Krakow) with my best friend and our moms. I had never been to Europe before and we were coming from a densely populated small state, where pretty much no ethnicity seems to be a minority. Poland was the whitest f*cking place I have ever been. I only met two black guys and an Asian chick while I was there, and all three were British. I guess it makes sense that I’m used to seeing all kinds of people, coming from the US, but it was shocking to teenage me.

Another thing was that all of the people were beautiful. Well-dressed, perfect hair, and ridiculously good looking. All we wanted to do was talk to guys all day.”

#7

Image source: leftofmarx, pexels

“Got off the plane in Frankfurt and there were people riding bicycles and smoking cigarettes inside the airport. There were also people riding bicycles and smoking cigarettes at the same time inside the airport.

I also got the notion that people in Europe in general were far more free than in the United States. It opened my eyes to the fact that the USA isn’t really such a “sweet land of liberty” and freedom at all.”

#8

Image source: leicanthrope, unsplash

“The three things that struck me when I visited France for the first time:

– So many people smoking.
– You can actually get near old things. I live in California, where 150 years is archaic. Walking through a 900 year old building, and being able to touch the walls was mindblowing to me.
– Just how insanely easy it is to spot other Americans.”

#9

Image source: NapalmZygote, unsplash

“I never realized how consistently, unconsciously unsafe I felt in the USA until I moved over here. People don’t really f*ck with you or your sh*t where I live now.”

#10

Image source: notsamsmum, pxhere

“Americans think 100 years is a long time, and Europeans think 100 miles is a long way.”

#11

Image source: retrouvailles26, unsplash

“The other day I asked a pharmacist how much my prescription would be and she laaaaaaaughed and laughed, as in, ‘Oh you silly Americans, having to pay for your medicine…’

Also, the wind in Scotland is simply hilarious. I couldn’t stand still without being pushed backwards, let alone walk in a straight line.”

#12

Image source: Chippedcoffeemug, Unsplash

“The Italian’s way of driving. Never in anytime of my life was I more paranoid of being hit by a moped.”

#13

Image source: [deleted] , pexels

“How clean and efficient the rail system is. AmTrak is a f*cking joke.”

#14

Image source: [deleted] , unsplash

“Not being bankrupted by a broken leg.”

#15

Image source: SnooGoats4933, unsplash

“Affordable higher education.”

#16

Image source: I_might_be_naked, unsplash

“People in Scotland (Specifically Glasgow) are the nicest I’ve ever met, seriously. People would have friendly conversations with you at bus stops, and one person even lent me £2 spare cash at a gas station for petrol. It seems to be 90% of people there are like that. Very unusual.”

#17

Image source: mberre, pexels

“The way the use of foreign languages is seen. In the states, there was always a certain amount of indifference, or even stigma for being a foreign-language enthusiast.

But around here, the use of foreign languages on a daily basis is essentially a social norm.”

#18

Image source: [deleted], unsplash

“I lived in Hengelo for a year for work purposes. Bike culture in the Netherlands is absolutely wonderful and I miss it.”

#19

Image source: vheissu417, pexels

“Went to London and Paris recently. I tipped a bartender in London and he looked shocked. Also everything I bought was the exact price it said. I’m so used to adding up 6.5 percent to everything.”

#20

Image source: 57471571C5, unsplash

“Public transportation across cities, in rural areas and across countries.”

Saumya Ratan

Saumya loves to explore beautiful, crazy, and wholesome stuff on the internet. She seeks to find something interesting in everything and strives to share her inspirations and explorations with people all over the world.

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Tags

america, america vs europe, americans, culture shock, Europe, Europeans, normal in Europe but strange in America, things Americans find weird in Europe, U.S.
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