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“Brutalist Buildings”: 20 Concrete Structures That Are Magnificently Impressive

Published 2 months ago

The “Brutalist buildings” FB page has updated its catalogue with more amazing pictures of big concrete buildings and their fascinating shapes are as stunning as ever. 

Showcasing the most jaw-droppingly beautiful brutalist structures from around the world, these towering concrete giants are rather awe-inspiring even if you’re not an architecture enthusiast. So sit back and revel in the magnificence of these design marvels born in the concrete jungle. 

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#1 Private house (1965) | Zürich, Switzerland | Architect: Hans Demarmels

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#2 Lila Acheson Wallace World of Birds at the Bronx Zoo (1972) | New York, NY, US | Architect: Morris Ketchum

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#3 Faculty of Computer Science and Cybernetics at University Taras Shevchenko (1969) | Kiev, Ukraine

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#4 Foundation for Medical Researches – “La Tulipe” (1976) | Genève / Geneva, Switzerland | Architect: Jack Vicajee Bertoli | Photo: Magda Ghali

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#5 Lamela Residential Building (1976) | Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina | Architect: Slobodan Jovandić

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#6 Building Plurioso (1972) | Rome, Italy | Architect: Saverio Busiri Vici | Photo: Il Conte Photography

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#7 Private house (1965) | Stabio, Switzerland | Architect: Mario Botta | Photo: Arnout Fonck

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#8 Musmeci Bridge, aka bridge over the Basento river (designed in 1967, started in 1971, completed in 1976) | Potenza, Italy | Architect: Sergio Musmeci

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#9 ENAIP Vocational Training Centre, former elementary school (1962) | Busto Arsizio (near Milano / Milan), Italy | Architect: Enrico Castiglioni | Photo: Stefano Perego

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#10 Armenian Writers Association’s Summer Residence, the canteen (1969) | Sevan Peninsula, Armenia | Architect: Gevorg Kochar

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#11 Crafton Hills College (1972) | Yucaipa, California, US | Architect: E. Stewart Williams | Photo: Darren Bradley

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#12 Residential house aka Olympic Pyramid (1976 | Montreal, Canada | Architects: Roger D’Astous and Luc Durand

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#13 LateCorbusier with metal and glass and with some Brutalist details | Heidi Weber Museum (1967) | Zürich, Switzerland | Architect: Le Corbusier

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#14 Zvartnots International Airport (1970’s), under demolition threat (expanded with new parts in 1998 and 2004) | Yerevan, Armenia | Architects: S. Bagdasaryan, A. Tarkhanyan, S. Khachikyan, Zh. Shekhlyan, L. Cherkezyan – later involved А. Tigranyan and А. Meschyan | Photo: Rob Schoefield

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#15 City Hall (1968) |  Arnhem, Netherlands |  Architect: Johannes Jacobus Konijnenburg

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#16 National Archives (started in 1976, completed in 1983) | Bratislava, Slovakia | Architect: Vladimír Dedeček

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#17 Estate Parkitka (project: 1986-89) | Częstochowa, Poland | Architect: Marian Kruszyński

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#18 Flamatt 1 (1958) House | Wünnewil-Flamatt (near Bern), Switzerland | Architects: Atelier 5 (Erwin Fritz, Samuel Gerber, Rolf Hesterberg, Hans Hostettler and Alfredo Pini – later joined: Niklaus Morgenthaler)

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#19 Bank of Israel (1974) | Jerusalem, Israel | Architects: Arieh and Eldar Sharon | Photo: Ariel Jerozolimski / Bloomberg

Image source: Brutalist buildings

#20 Tribute to Kevin Roche | Knights of Columbus Building (1969) | New Haven, Connecticut, US | Architectural firm: Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates | Photo: Seth Tisue

Image source: Brutalist buildings

 

Shanilou Perera

Shanilou has always loved reading and learning about the world we live in. While she enjoys fictional books and stories just as much, since childhood she was especially fascinated by encyclopaedias and strangely enough, self-help books. As a kid, she spent most of her time consuming as much knowledge as she could get her hands on and could always be found at the library. Now, she still enjoys finding out about all the amazing things that surround us in our day-to-day lives and is blessed to be able to write about them to share with the whole world as a profession.

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brutalist, Brutalist buildings, Brutalist structures, concrete, concrete structure
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